Preventing Traveller's Thrombosis (Economy Class Syndrome)

Replenish Lost Water To Help Prevent Traveller's Thrombosis (Economy Class Syndrome)

Learn about traveller's thrombosis (economy class syndrome)

What is traveller's thrombosis (economy class syndrome)

Traveller's thrombosis is something to be careful about when you have to sit in the same position for a long time, such as when on an airplane.

There is a risk of blood clots forming in veins deep inside the body. In the lower legs it occurs by venous stasis (slow blood flow). If these blood clots travel from the deep veins through the blood stream and become lodged in the lungs, a pulmonary embolism will develop. Together these two are called traveller's thrombosis or economy class syndrome.

Economy class syndrome doesn't only happen on airplanes

You may think that traveller's thrombosis usually occurs only on planes, since it is also called economy class syndrome. However, it can also occur during long-distance travel by train or other vehicles, when doing desk work, during long meetings, or at the movies when sitting without moving for a prolonged period. Air conditioned office environments in particular are similar to the environment in a plane. It is important to know what traveller's thrombosis is, understand its causes, and take precautionary measures to avoid any problems.

Replenish water effectively with an electrolyte beverage

Fluid intake(or hydration) is important

Traveller's thrombosis is something to be careful of when you have to sit in the same position for a long time, such as when on an airplane.

When blood clots form from blood congestion in the lower legs, caused by the pressure from sitting for a long time, it is called a pulmonary embolism. When those blood clots travel to and become stuck in the lungs, it is called a pulmonary embolism. Together these two are called traveller's thrombosis, or economy class syndrome.

Which is more effective: an electrolyte beverage or water?

Otsuka Pharmaceutical conducted a clinical study to investigate the effect of an electrolyte beverage on blood viscosity during an actual long distance international flight. Forty subjects and staff flew from Japan to the USA . All subjects were assigned to two groups of 20 each: an electrolyte beverage group and a mineral water group. Subjects drank the same volume of the test beverage at the same time during the nine hour flight.

"Beverage containing electrolytes and carbohydrates group suitable": Published in the Journal of the American Medical Association

The study results, obtained by by comparing blood viscosity within both groups at the end of the flight, showed that, under conditions such as flying in an airplane, an electrolyte beverage is more suitable than mineral water.

The details of the study were published in the Journal of the American Medical Association in February 2002 by Mikio Zeniya, an associate professor at Jikei University, et al.

Get the facts! Which is more effective, water or an electrolyte beverage?